Lithium-ion batteries contain a large variety of materials in a complex battery design that must be separated for effective recycling. These batteries were designed to optimize performance, not to optimize the ease of end-of-life recycling. The best recycling method often depends on the chemistry of the battery. Yet, many of the chemistries of advanced batteries are still evolving, making the best recycling methods a moving target.

By leveraging the R&D expertise of the collaborators, the ReCell Center, takes a closed-loop approach to battery design and recycling. As best practices for recycling methods for battery disassembly and material separation are developed, they will be factored into the design of new batteries to further improve material recovery and battery performance. The partners will focus on upgrading technology for recovering materials, developing new methods to reuse materials, and optimizing recycling processes.

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne National Laboratory focuses on building a process development facility and overseeing direct recycling. This includes advances in cathode-to-cathode processes, cell design, and recycle process modeling.

National Renewable Energy Lab

National Renewable Energy Lab

National Renewable Energy Lab oversees the evaluation of the impact of second life, including relithiation, on recyclability, thermal analysis for system dynamics, and supply chain modeling.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Oak Ridge National Laboratory focuses on the design of cells and electrodes to optimize recyclability. It will also on anode graphite separation methods.

Michigan Technical University

Michigan Technical University

Michigan Technological University advances mechanical separations techniques for use with novel physical methods for cathode-cathode separations.